Thousands of people in Iran are willing to sell their organs in order to make ends meet

Desperate Iranians Selling Their Organs Because of Financial Crisis

Navid Felker 21 September 2019

by Navid  Felker

Shocking reports from Iran indicate that there are thousands of people in Iran willing to sell their organs in order to make ends meet. The practice has shocked the international community but it is becoming more and more commonplace in Iran.

More people than ever before are falling into extreme poverty – or the absolute poverty category as it is known. Absolute poverty is when a household’s income is below a specified level meaning that the family is unable to meet the most basic of needs including sustenance, clean and potable water, healthcare, shelter and education. The United Nations defines absolute poverty as a major deprivation of basic human needs that is not just dependent upon income, but also on access to services.

Exhibition in U.S. Capitol On Thursday in honor of political prisoners massacred in 1988 by the Iranian regime

Iran: Exhibition in U.S. Capitol in Honor of 30,000 Fallen for Freedom

Staff Writer 13 September 2019

By Armin Baldwin

On Thursday, September 12, 2019, an exhibition was held on the grounds of U.S. Capitol in honor of 30,000 political prisoners massacred in 1988 by the Iranian regime in the span of just eight weeks, and in condemnation of ongoing human rights violations in Iran.

This rally was organized by the Organization of Iranian American Communities (OIAC) in aim to save the lives of the innocent in Iran and hold accountable the religious despots who are committing these atrocities.

Republican congressman Honorable Eliot Engel, Chairman of House Foreign Affairs Committee spoke to Iranian community’s exhibition, remembering the 1988 Massacre in Iran, and Sahar Khodayari, 28-year-old football fan who died after setting herself on fire in protest to being sentenced to imprisonment for entering a soccer stadium banned for women in Iran.

Background

In the summer of 1988, the Iranian regime summarily and extra-judicially executed tens of thousands of political prisoners held in jails across Iran. The massacre was carried out on the basis of a fatwa by the regime’s then-Supreme Leader Ruhollah Khomeini.

The facts:

• More than 30,000 political prisoners were massacred in Iran in the summer of 1988.

• The massacre was carried out on the basis of a fatwa by Khomeini.

• The vast majority of the victims were activists of the opposition PMOI (MEK).

• A Death Committee approved all the death sentences.

• Alireza Avaei, a member of the Death Committee, is today Hassan Rouhani’s Justice Minister.

• The perpetrators of the 1988 massacre have never been brought to justice.

• On August 9, 2016, an audio tape was published for the first time of Khomeini’s former heir acknowledging that that massacre took place and had been ordered at the highest levels.

Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, the President-elect of the Iranian Resistance, described the audio recording as a historical document. She said the recording attested in the strongest possible manner both to the Mojahedin (PMOI/MEK) political prisoners’ rejection of surrender and to their admirable allegiance to, and perseverance in, their commitment to the Iranian people. The recording is also irrefutable evidence that leaders of the mullahs’ regime are responsible for crimes against humanity and the unprecedented genocide, Mrs. Rajavi said.

There are strong indications that Khomeini’s fatwa, which led to the massacre of some 30,000 political prisoners in Iran, was issued on July 26, 1988.

The Iranian regime has never acknowledged these executions, or provided any information as to how many prisoners were killed.

The majority of those executed were either serving prison sentences for their political activities or had already finished their sentences but were still kept in prison.

Some of them had previously been imprisoned and released, but were again arrested and executed during the massacre. The wave of massacre of political prisoners began in late July and continued unabated for several months.

By the time it ended in the autumn of 1988, some 30,000 political prisoners, the overwhelming majority activists of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI or MEK), were slaughtered.

Role of Hassan Rouhani in 1988 massacre of political prisoners

Hassan Rouhani was Deputy Commander-in-chief of the regime’s armed forces at the time. Furthermore, since 1982 he was a member of the regime’s Supreme Defense Council and a member of the Central Council of the War Logistics Headquarters.

In those positions, he was fully cognizant of this hideous crime and obviously was in full conformity.

This shows that the notion that Rouhani is a “moderate” and “reform minded” is absolutely preposterous and baseless. Actually he, like all other senior officials of the regime, is a culprit of this hideous crime.

On August 30, 2019 a similar exhibition was held on the 31st anniversary of the massacre of Iranian political prisoners, and to mark the International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances , at Paris District 1 City Hall.

 

Sahar Khodayari, a young woman who had set her self in fire to protest against suppression and discrimination, died on Monday September 9th 2019

Iran: Heart-Breaking Death of Sahar Shakes the World

Navid Felker 11 September 2019

by Navid  Felker

Sahar Khodayari, a young woman who had set her self in the fire to protest against suppression and discrimination, died on Monday, September 9th, 2019. 

Sahar Khodayari, 29, faced charges of "appearing in public without a hijab" when she attempted to enter the stadium "dressed as a man" in March, according to Amnesty.
"She was stopped from entering when the stadium's security guards discovered she was a woman," Amnesty said in a statement.

Amnesty International has expressed concern about activists and journalists continue to be discriminated in Iran.

Amnesty International Once Again Draws Attention to Horrific Human Rights Abuses in Iran

Atousa Pilger 11 September 2019

by Atousa Pilger

On 7th September, a Revolutionary Court in Iran sentenced three labour rights activists and four journalists to very heavy prison sentences between six and 18 years in length. One was also sentenced to 74 lashes.

Amnesty International has commented on these excessive sentences and has expressed concern that activists and journalists continue to be discriminated against.

Branch 28 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court announced the sentencing verdicts for the seven individuals that were arrested within the past year. The individuals had been peacefully protesting for the rights of workers, and the journalists had been documenting the events.

Iran regime’s Revolutionary Court condemns 6 labor and civil rights activist to the total of 110 years in prison.

Iran: 110 Years of Prison for Civil and Labor Rights Activist

Armin Baldwin 09 September 2019

By Armin Baldwin

On September 7, Iran regime’s Revolutionary Court in Tehran, presided by Judge Mohammad Moghayseh, condemned 6 labor and civil rights activist to the total of 110 years in prison. The list includes: Esmail Bakhshi, condemned to 14 years in prison and 74 lashes, Mohammad Khonifar to 6 years in prison, Sepide Ghelyan, Amir Amir-Gholy, Amir-Hossain Mohammadi-Far and his wife Sanaz Alahyari and Assal Mohammadi, each condemned to 18 years in prison. The case of Ali Nejati, another activist is still open.
These activist were arrested for participating in the long sit-in and protest of the Haftappe Sugar Factory, in the southern city of Ahwaz.

New acid attacks

Iran: New Acid Attacks & Arrests of 68 Young Partygoers in Mixed Gender Parties

Navid Felker 04 September 2019

by Navid  Felker

According to Hrana News agency, on Saturday a young Iranian couple were attacked by two unidentified men in Tehran’s Fortress Park, who threw acid on them.

In previous years, the Iranian regime's paramilitary bassij force have staged similar attacks against young women in various cities of Iran.

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